Picture child's feet next to pens, pencils and paper

Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

Explore Open Access education research. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Tracking emotional and behavioural changes in childhood : does the strength and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) measure the same constructs across time?

Sosu, Edward M. and Schmidt, Peter (2016) Tracking emotional and behavioural changes in childhood : does the strength and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) measure the same constructs across time? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 35 (7). pp. 643-656. ISSN 1557-5144

[img] Text (Sosu-Schmidt-JPA-2016-Tracking-emotional-and-behavioural-changes-in-childhood.pdf)
Sosu_Schmidt_JPA_2016_Tracking_emotional_and_behavioural_changes_in_childhood.pdf.docx
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (132kB)

Abstract

Goodman’s (1997) Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is widely used to measure emotional and behavioural difficulties in childhood and adolescence. In the present study, we examined whether the SDQ measures the same construct across time, when used for longitudinal research. A nationally representative sample of parents (N=3375) provided data on their children at ages 4, 5, and 6. Using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) for ordinal data, two competing models (3 versus 5-factor models) were tested to establish equivalence across time. Results showed that the 5-factor model had a superior fit to the data compared to the alternative 3-factor model which only achieved an adequate fit at a configural level. Strong longitudinal factorial invariance was established for the 5-factor parent version of the SDQ. Our findings support the use of the SDQ in longitudinal studies, and provide the important psychometric information required for basing educational, clinical and policy decisions on outcomes of the SDQ.