Picture of offices in the City of London

Open Access research that is better understanding work in the global economy...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation based within Strathclyde Business School.

Better understanding the nature of work and labour within the globalised political economy is a focus of the 'Work, Labour & Globalisation Research Group'. This involves researching the effects of new forms of labour, its transnational character and the gendered aspects of contemporary migration. A Scottish perspective is provided by the Scottish Centre for Employment Research (SCER). But the research specialisms of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation go beyond this to also include front-line service work, leadership, the implications of new technologies at work, regulation of employment relations and workplace innovation.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

The continuing professional development of Scottish early years workers: using evidence to move from policy to practice

Seagraves, Liz and Condie, Rae (2009) The continuing professional development of Scottish early years workers: using evidence to move from policy to practice. In: 19th EECERA annual conference: diversities in early childhood education, 2009-08-26 - 2009-08-29. (Unpublished)

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Until recently in Scotland, there has been little in the way of coherent and consistent policies for the pre-service preparation of early years practitioners nor for their ongoing continuous professional development. The New Standard for Childhood Practice and the Early Years Framework address exactly these issues but new policies in themselves do not improve practice. Turning policy into practice is notoriously difficult as it often requires practitioners to reflect upon and change long-held beliefs and conceptions of their role and the workplace - and uncomfortable and often unwelcome strategy. In Scotland, recent educational initiatives have invested significantly in staff development programmes designed to introduce new ways of working. In this instance, those charged with implementing the new early years policy decided that such a programme would be more effective if based on an understanding of the needs and aspirations of practitioners and managers themselves and an awareness of the provision already made. They therefore commissioned a team of researchers from the University of Strathclyde to investigate the needs of and document the continuing professional development provision available to early years managers and practitioners. Drawing on documentary analysis and two phases of evidence gathering from practitioners, their managers and local authority officers, this paper presents some of the key findings from the review, set within the context of the early years debate and the government's aspirations for the sector.