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Digital literacies for employability- fostering forms of capital online

Costa, Cristina and Gilliland, Gemma (2017) Digital literacies for employability- fostering forms of capital online. Revista da UIIPS, 5 (2). pp. 186-197. ISSN 2182-9608

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Abstract

The web has revolutionised the world of knowledge and created new literacies practices to operate in a mediated world. In doing so, it has reinvented the workplace, the skills, attitudes and values individual attribute to contemporary forms of communication as a form of learning, living and working in a digital society. This article provides a reflection of digital literacies as forms of capitals that can be acquired, enhanced or transformed online. The article also discusses how this conceptualisation of digital literacies as capitals were applied to the design of an open online course (MOOC) focused on digital literacies for employability. Finally, the article provides recommendations regarding the development and deployment of digital literacies as a key area of learning.