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Accessing a 'very, very secret garden' : exploring children's and young people's literacy practices using participatory research methods

Calderón López, Margarita and Theriault, Virginie (2017) Accessing a 'very, very secret garden' : exploring children's and young people's literacy practices using participatory research methods. Language and Literacy, 19 (4). pp. 39-54. ISSN 1496-0974

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Abstract

Despite the wealth of publications on children’s and young people’s participation in research, the connections between participatory research methods (PRM) and literacy studies remain unclear. The aim of this paper is to understand why it is particularly pertinent to use PRM in literacy studies (particularly New Literacy Studies). In order to capture the complexity and plurality of these methods, we discuss two studies, one conducted with children in Chile and the other with young people in Québec (Canada). We argue that by using PRM, researchers can support participants in the appropriation of an alternative and potentially empowering view of literacy.