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Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

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The non-verbal narrative in adult-infant engagements

Delafield-Butt, Jonathan and Harder, Susanne and Væver, Mette and Trevarthen, Colwyn (2012) The non-verbal narrative in adult-infant engagements. In: BPS 2012 Developmental Section Annual Conference 2012, 2012-09-05 - 2012-09-07.

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Abstract

Narrative is regarded as fundamental to human meaning-making with a history of study that dates back to the ancient Greeks. Stories between adult individuals made with expressions of voice and gesture altogether produce regular narrative patterns of engagement characterised by a four-part structure that (i) opens the engagement, (ii) builds through reciprocated cycles of expression with cross-modal fluency and expressive timing before, (iii) reaching a climax of intensity, and (iv) receding to conclusion and quiescence again. This basic narrative structure, found across adult dialogue and story-telling in music, film, dance and drama, is also present in early mother-infant proto-conversational engagements. We present an analysis of the movements and vocalisations recorded from ten mother-infant pairs in face-to-face engagements, at four and seven months of age. We identify narrative events, their composition, timing, and frequency. We discuss their putative importance in generating affective attunement and effective co-regulation within the dyad, giving periods of socioemotional learning. The presence of co-created narrative structures in early infant social development suggests this pattern of engagement, with its characteristic four-part structure, is a foundational process that gives shared meaning to human minds.