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Collaborative continuing professional development (CPD) for teachers in Scotland : aspirations, opportunities and barriers

Kennedy, Aileen (2011) Collaborative continuing professional development (CPD) for teachers in Scotland : aspirations, opportunities and barriers. European Journal of Teacher Education, 34 (1). pp. 25-41. ISSN 0261-9768

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Abstract

This paper explores stakeholders' views on the desirability of collaborative continuing professional development (CPD) and examines potential barriers. It draws on two projects which each explore perceptions of CPD for teachers in Scotland. The data include interviews with key informants and with practising teachers as well as survey data from year 2-6 teachers. Analysis of data reveals an aspirational view of collaborative CPD, yet some of the data also reveal a pragmatic, occupational approach to CPD where the structure of the CPD framework is seen as fixed and not conducive to collaborative endeavour. The data are analysed with reference to the triple lens framework (Fraser et al. 2007) which offers a composite framework for understanding teacher learning. The analysis is considered in relation to both the growing literature on collaborative CPD and the current policy context in Scotland, drawing out key messages of relevance to wider European and international contexts.