Picture child's feet next to pens, pencils and paper

Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

Explore Open Access education research. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Higher education and non-pecuniary returns in Germany : tracing the mechanisms behind field of study effects at the start of the career

Klein, Markus (2011) Higher education and non-pecuniary returns in Germany : tracing the mechanisms behind field of study effects at the start of the career. Irish Educational Studies, 30 (2). pp. 253-270. ISSN 0332-3315

[img]
Preview
Text (Klein-IES-2011-Higher-education-and-non-pecuniary-returns-in-Germany)
Klein_IES_2011_Higher_education_and_non_pecuniary_returns_in_Germany.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (578kB) | Preview

Abstract

This article addresses the question of why fields of study differ in early labour market returns. It is argued that the higher the potential training costs of a field of study the more problematic the labour market integration of graduates. This is due to the fact that employers use the occupational specificity and selectivity of a study programme as a signal for the expected training costs. In addition, the article suggests that structural relations between fields and occupations act as mediators for the effect of field of study on non-pecuniary returns. Using the German HIS Graduate Panel 1997, the results indicate that a lack of occupational specificity is partly responsible for differences between fields of study. Selectivity measures do not contribute to an explanation. As expected, working in the public sector and the required expertise for a job strongly mediate field of study differences.