Picture of sea vessel plough through rough maritime conditions

Innovations in marine technology, pioneered through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research here explores the potential of marine renewables, such as offshore wind, current and wave energy devices to promote the delivery of diverse energy sources. Expertise in offshore hydrodynamics in offshore structures also informs innovations within the oil and gas industries. But as a world-leading centre of marine technology, the Department is recognised as the leading authority in all areas related to maritime safety, such as resilience engineering, collision avoidance and risk-based ship design. Techniques to support sustainability vessel life cycle management is a key research focus.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Examining and exploring issues of power and ethics in researching marginalised youth : the dilemmas of the practitioner researcher

Mowat, Joan G. (2015) Examining and exploring issues of power and ethics in researching marginalised youth : the dilemmas of the practitioner researcher. In: Researching Marginalized Groups. Routledge, London, pp. 75-89. ISBN 9781317581215

[img]
Preview
Text (Mowat-2015-examining-and-exploring-issues-of-power-and-ethics)
Mowat_2015_examining_and_exploring_issues_of_power_and_ethics.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (670kB) | Preview

Abstract

This chapter explores and examines the ethical dimensions and dilemmas of engaging in practitioner research on a marginalised group – young people experiencing Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties (SEBD) - within the context of a Secondary school in the West of Scotland, situated in an area of multiple deprivation. It examines a wide range of issues pertaining to power and authority, role conflict, identity, subjectivity, boundaries, communication, confidentiality, anonymity, child welfare and the integrity of the research process. It sets this within the context of an evaluative case study of an intervention, developed and implemented by the author with a team of volunteers (principally Pastoral Care and Behaviour Support Teachers), to support children with SEBD. The key messages are for the need to adopt a reflexive and sensitive approach, taking account of culture and context and, at all times, to be guided by the highest ethical principles of respect, openness, honesty and integrity.