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Teaching mathematics : self-knowledge, pupil knowledge and content knowledge

MacLellan, Effie (2012) Teaching mathematics : self-knowledge, pupil knowledge and content knowledge. In: Improving Primary Mathematics Teaching and Learning. The Open University Press, pp. 213-228. ISBN 9780335246762

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Abstract

Mathematical learning is significantly influenced by the quality of mathematics teaching (Hiebert and Grouws 2007). In spite of the evidence for teachers seeking to do what they believe to be in the best interests of their learners (Schuck 2009; Gholami and Husu 2010), research and policy reports (within the UK and beyond) draw attention to insufficient mathematical attainment (Williams 2008; Eurydice 2011). Why is there this discrepancy? On the one hand, teachers are open to improving their professional practices (Escudero and S´anchez 2007), and on the other, the findings of mathematical education research make little or no impact on teachers’ practice (Wiliam 2003), even although teachers themselves think that they are enacting new or revised practices (Speer 2005).