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Mediating 'aspirant' religious-sexual futures : in god’s hands?

Taylor, Yvette (2017) Mediating 'aspirant' religious-sexual futures : in god’s hands? Sociological Research Online. ISSN 1360-7804

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Abstract

This paper explores the construction of vocational and familial futures, in times of 'aspiring', 'post-welfare,' or 'crisis' youth transitions, as mediated by sexual-religious identification. By considering the intersectional relations of both sexuality and religion in constructing young people’s aspirations, the paper highlights pragmatic and caring orientations, including a 'calling' to religion as a site of present-future vocational and familial investment. I challenge the separation of religion and sexuality in youth transitions, and in notions of the 'times we're in' as compelling certain kinds of future-orientated aspirant (and secular) selves. Overall, the article hopes to contribute to theorising the intersection sexuality and religion in further understanding the subversive – and conservative – potential of religious-sexual values and futures. Such orientations interface with aspects of 'getting by' and 'getting on' and at once re-inscribe and stretch normative vocational and familial choices.