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Convergent and divergent validity between the KTK and MOT 4-6 motor tests in early childhood

Bardid, Farid and Huyben, Floris and Deconinck, Frederik J A and De Martelaer, Kristine and Seghers, Jan and Lenoir, Matthieu (2016) Convergent and divergent validity between the KTK and MOT 4-6 motor tests in early childhood. Adapted physical activity quarterly : APAQ. pp. 33-47. ISSN 1543-2777

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the convergent and divergent validity between the Body Coordination Test for Children (KTK) and the Motor Proficiency Test for 4- to 6-Year-Old Children (MOT 4-6). A total of 638 children (5-6 yr old) took part in the study. The results showed a moderately positive association between the total scores of both tests (r = .63). Moreover, the KTK total score correlated more highly with the MOT 4-6 gross motor score than with the MOT 4-6 fine motor score (r = .62 vs. .32). Levels of agreement were moderate when identifying children with moderate or severe motor problems and low at best when detecting children with higher motor-competence levels. This study provides evidence of convergent and divergent validity between the KTK and MOT 4-6. However, given the moderate to low levels of agreement, either measurement may lead to possible categorization errors. Children's motor competence should therefore not be judged based on the result of a single test.