Picture of sea vessel plough through rough maritime conditions

Innovations in marine technology, pioneered through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research here explores the potential of marine renewables, such as offshore wind, current and wave energy devices to promote the delivery of diverse energy sources. Expertise in offshore hydrodynamics in offshore structures also informs innovations within the oil and gas industries. But as a world-leading centre of marine technology, the Department is recognised as the leading authority in all areas related to maritime safety, such as resilience engineering, collision avoidance and risk-based ship design. Techniques to support sustainability vessel life cycle management is a key research focus.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Experimental demonstration of kilometer-range quantum digital signatures

Donaldson, Ross J. and Collins, Robert J. and Kleczkowska, Klaudia and Amiri, Ryan and Wallden, Petros and Dunjko, Vedran and Jeffers, John and Andersson, Erika and Buller, Gerald S. (2016) Experimental demonstration of kilometer-range quantum digital signatures. Physical Review A, 93 (1). ISSN 1094-1622

[img]
Preview
Text (Donaldson-etal-PR2016-experimental-demonstrations-of-kilometer-range-quantum-digital-signatures)
Donaldson_etal_PR2016_experimental_demonstrations_of_kilometer_range_quantum_digital_signatures.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 logo

Download (646kB) | Preview

Abstract

We present an experimental realization of a quantum digital signature protocol which, together with a standard quantum key distribution link, increases transmission distance to kilometer ranges, three orders of magnitude larger than in previous realizations. The bit rate is also significantly increased compared with previous quantum signature demonstrations. This work illustrates that quantum digital signatures can be realized with optical components similar to those used for quantum key distribution and could be implemented in existing quantum optical fiber networks.