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Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

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Undergraduate dissertations in a department of architecture

Romice, Ombretta and Yaneske, P.P. (2005) Undergraduate dissertations in a department of architecture. Centre for Education in the Built Environment Transactions, 2 (2). pp. 4-15. ISSN 1745-0322

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Abstract

Undergraduate academic writing in a Department of Architecture offers opportunities as well as challenges. To students, it can be a source of independent research and learning, enriching their development as architects and critics of the built environment; at the same time it can be an obstacle, a perceived impediment to design work. To staff, it can be a chance to share their research interest with colleagues and students, so enriching exchange and debate; it can also be time consuming and not clearly relevant to the formation of a professional. This case study argues that a change in attitude towards the objectives of the dissertation, coupled with careful consideration of its curriculum, can enhance the role that undergraduate academic writing plays in a School of Architecture, extending its benefits to the development of research and design agendas.