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Open Access research that is better understanding work in the global economy...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation based within Strathclyde Business School.

Better understanding the nature of work and labour within the globalised political economy is a focus of the 'Work, Labour & Globalisation Research Group'. This involves researching the effects of new forms of labour, its transnational character and the gendered aspects of contemporary migration. A Scottish perspective is provided by the Scottish Centre for Employment Research (SCER). But the research specialisms of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation go beyond this to also include front-line service work, leadership, the implications of new technologies at work, regulation of employment relations and workplace innovation.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Teaching vocational undergraduates in a further education college: a case study of practice

Soden, Rebecca and Pithers, Robert (2001) Teaching vocational undergraduates in a further education college: a case study of practice. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Vocational Education Research, 9 (1). pp. 85-106. ISSN 1039-4001

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Abstract

An avowed aim of higher education is to enable students to become able to think well, although what this might mean is problematic. This study contributes to our understanding of lecturers' and students' attempts to work towards this end in vocational degree courses provided in the further education sector. It describes these attempts from the viewpoint of students and lecturers. Individual interviews were conducted with 60 undergraduates in a further education college and with 10 lecturers. Additionally, a teaching session with each of the lecturers was observed, and 45 of the students responded to a questionnaire. The paper raises questions about how students' previous education experience might impact on current learning, about what might count as good practice in the circumstances described and about impediments to improving practice.