Children's metabolic expenditure during object projection skill performance : new insight for activity intensity relativity

Sacko, Ryan S. and Nesbitt, Danielle and McIver, Kerry and Brian, Ali and Bardid, Farid and Stodden, David F. (2019) Children's metabolic expenditure during object projection skill performance : new insight for activity intensity relativity. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37 (15). pp. 1755-1761. ISSN 0264-0414

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    Abstract

    Objective: To examine children’s energy expenditure (EE) during object projection skill performance at three intensity intervals. Methods: Children’s (42, Mage = 8.1) average metabolic equivalents of task (METs) were calculated using a COSMED K4b2 while they repeatedly performed blocks of kicking, throwing (overhand), and striking (two-handed) during 6, 12, and 30-s interval conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of covariance examined differences in METs while controlling for skill level. Results: Data indicated a main effect for interval condition (df = 2, 123, F = 94.36, p <.001, η2 =.605). Post hoc t-tests demonstrated decreasing performance interval times yielded progressively higher METs (p <.001) across the three conditions (30s = 4.5±0.8 METs, 12s = 6.3±1.3, 6s = 8.3±1.6). There also was a main effect for sex (df = 1,120, F = 52.28, p <.001 η2 =.305). Boys demonstrated higher METs at each performance interval (p <.001). Conclusion: Skill practice with a maximum of one trial every 30s resulted in the equivalent of at least moderate physical activity (>4.0 METs) and intervals of 6s demonstrated vigorous physical activity (>7.0 METs). Practicing/performing object projection skills, even at intervals that allow for adequate instruction and feedback (i.e., 1 trial/30s), promotes MVPA in children.