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Reflecting on changes in operational training in UK hospitality management degree programmes

Alexander, M. (2007) Reflecting on changes in operational training in UK hospitality management degree programmes. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 19 (3). pp. 211-220. ISSN 0959-6119

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Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this conceptual paper is to assess the continued relevance of operations based training within hospitality management higher education programmes. The paper explores the purpose of a hospitality management degree programme and how this might have impacted upon curriculum development and the student learning experience. Method: The paper attempts to draw together writing on some of the key issues surrounding operations based training including balancing preparedness for industry with providing a true higher education experience and the growing clamour for a more liberal approach to hospitality education. Findings: The paper identifies and discusses two UK programmes which have made significant changes to their operations provision. Originality/Value: The paper further explores issues around the debate into the hospitality curriculum adding a valuable dimension concerning operational training.