Picture child's feet next to pens, pencils and paper

Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

Explore Open Access education research. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on force coordination and muscle coherence during precision pinch

Lu, Szu-Ching and Xiu, Kaihua and Li, Ke and Marquardt, Tamara L and Evans, Peter J and Li, Zong-Ming (2017) Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on force coordination and muscle coherence during precision pinch. Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering, 37 (3). pp. 328-335. ISSN 1609-0985

[img]
Preview
Text (Lu-etal-JMBE-2018-Effects-of-carpal-tunnel-syndrome-on-force-coordination)
Lu_etal_JMBE_2018_Effects_of_carpal_tunnel_syndrome_on_force_coordination.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (205kB) | Preview

Abstract

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), caused by entrapment of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, impairs hand function including dexterous manipulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CTS on force coordination and muscle coherence during low-intensity sustained precision pinch while the wrist assumed different postures. Twenty subjects (10 CTS patients and 10 asymptomatic controls) participated in this study. An instrumented pinch device was used to measure the thumb and index finger forces while simultaneously collecting surface electromyographic activities of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. Subjects performed a sustained precision pinch at 10% maximum pinch force for 15 sec with the wrist stabilized at 30° extension, neutral, or 30° flexion using customized splints. The force discrepancy and the force coordination angle between the thumb and index finger forces were calculated, as well as the β-band (15-30 Hz) coherence between APB and FDI. The index finger applied greater force than the thumb (p < 0.05); this force discrepancy was increased with wrist flexion (p < 0.05), but was not affected by CTS (p > 0.05). The directional force coordination was not significantly affected by wrist posture or CTS (p > 0.05). In general, digit force coordination during precision pinch seems to be sensitive to wrist flexion, but is not affected by CTS. The β-band muscular coherence was increased by wrist flexion for CTS patients (p < 0.05), which could be a compensatory mechanism for the flexion-induced exacerbation of CTS symptoms. This study demonstrates that wrist flexion negatively influences muscle and force coordination in CTS patients supporting the avoidance of flexion posture for symptom exacerbation and functional performance.