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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

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SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Clinical monitoring of tooth wear progression in patients over a period of one year using CAD/CAM

Ahmed, Khaled E. and Whitters, John and Ju, Xiangyang and Pierce, S. Gareth and MacLeod, Charles N. and Murray, Colin A. (2016) Clinical monitoring of tooth wear progression in patients over a period of one year using CAD/CAM. International Journal of Prosthodontics. pp. 1-14. ISSN 1942-4426 (In Press)

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Abstract

Objective: To clinically monitor the progression of tooth wear over a period of one year in a cohort of referred tooth wear patients through the use of a CAD/CAD scanner and a standardised scanning/ assessment methodology. Methods: Polyether impressions were made of 11 participants (130 teeth) at baseline and one year. Impressions were poured in Type IV dental stone and anterior teeth 3D scanned. A surface matching software was used to compare one-year to baseline scans and identify any dimensional differences. Results: Parafunctional habits were reported by all patients. All participants exhibited tooth wear ≥140µm in depth, and extending to ≥280µm in at least one tooth. Upper central incisors were the most commonly and severely tooth wear affected teeth. Conclusion: The ability of the developed CAD/CAM scanning methodology in clinical monitoring of tooth wear was demonstrated. Further research is needed to assess its practicality in large-scale epidemiological tooth wear studies.