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A chronological exploration of the evolution of housing typologies in Gulf cities

Remali, Adel M. and Salama, Ashraf M. and Wiedmann, Florian and Ibrahim, Hatem G. (2016) A chronological exploration of the evolution of housing typologies in Gulf cities. City, Territory and Architecture, 3 (Articl). pp. 1-15. ISSN 2195-2701

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Abstract

This paper traces the evolution of housing typologies in four major cities in the Gulf region, namely Doha, Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Manama. The study reviews the formation and historical events in the region, which had a significant impact on new social as well as economic realities and consequently evolving housing types during the last two centuries. The methodological approach is based on reviewing a number of case studies representing local housing typologies throughout distinctive historic periods which were categorized in four periods: the post-nomadic, traditional, modern, and contemporary. The main objective is to identify the process of transformation by applying a comparative assessment of the different periods in order to examine continuities or ruptures between them. Thus, particular layout elements were analysed and compared. Conclusions are drawn to underline contemporary challenges while offering projections for future housing typologies in the selected cities and other similar ones.