Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Poverty and Children's Access to Services and Social Participation

Forbes, Joan and Sime, Daniela and McCartney, Elspeth and Graham, Archie and Valyo, Anne and Weiner, Gaby (2015) Poverty and Children's Access to Services and Social Participation. [Report]

[img]
Preview
Text (Forbes-etal-SUII-2015-poverty-and-childrens-access-to-services-and-social-participation)
Forbes_etal_SUII_2015_poverty_and_childrens_access_to_services_and_social_participation.pdf
Final Published Version

Download (4MB)| Preview

    Abstract

    This briefing paper summarises evidence in the research and policy literature on inequalities surrounding access to services and social participation for children and young people living in poverty in Scotland. The related policy and practice implications for services’ access and societal participation are also outlined. In the poverty and inequalities context, a mix of policy interventions aimed at rebalancing power at all levels are more likely to be effective to changing the status quo. Rather than searching for a single ‘silver bullet’, policy should target the multiple dimensions of poverty and inequality and their intersections as experienced by young people.