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Higher education means business: a summary of the economic impact of Scottish higher educaton institutions

Kelly, Ursula and McNicoll, Iain and Donald, Kelly (2006) Higher education means business: a summary of the economic impact of Scottish higher educaton institutions. [Report]

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Abstract

This study examined key economic features of the Scottish higher education institutions (HEIs) in the academic and financial year 2004 -2005 together with those aspects of their contribution to the economy that can be readily measured. The Scottish HEIs included in the study are the 20 institutions for which data is provided by the Higher Education Statistics Agency. Major economic characteristics of the HEIs were examined, including their revenue, expenditure and employment. The study also included modelled analysis of the economic activity generated in other sectors of the economy through the secondary or 'knock-on' effects of the expenditure of the institution, its staff and international students. Overall this summary presents an up-to-date examination of the quantifiable contribution of Scottish HEIs to the economy.