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(Turning our) back to the future? Cross-sector perspectives on language learning

Jones, Lynne and Doughty, Hannelore (2015) (Turning our) back to the future? Cross-sector perspectives on language learning. Scottish Languages Review (29). pp. 27-40.

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Abstract

This paper reports on the analysis of a subset of the data related to a wider project about perspectives on language learning as part of the launch event of the Scottish Government’s 1+2 language policy in November 2012. Transcriptions of interviews with learners from primary, secondary and tertiary education sectors were compared and contrasted using an iterative coding process. The findings suggest that the lack of challenge in the language curriculum, previously identified by McPake et al in 1999, continues to act as a demotivating factor, compounded by poor transition arrangements between education sectors. A subsequently conducted literature review revealed commonalities with our own findings. Some recommendations for stakeholders in languages education are put forward for consideration.