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Seven myths about young children and technology

McPake, Joanna and Plowman, Lydia (2013) Seven myths about young children and technology. Childhood Education, 89 (1). pp. 27-33. ISSN 0009-4056

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Abstract

Parents and educators tend to have many questions about young children's play with computers and other technologies at home. They can find it difficult to know what is best for children because these toys and products were not around when they were young. Some will tell you that children have an affinity for technology that will be valuable in their future lives. Others think that children should not be playing with technology when they could be playing outside or reading a book.