Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Metabolism of quercetin and kaempferol by rat hepatocytes and identification of flavonoid glycosides in plasma

Oliveira, E.D.J. and Watson, D.G. and Grant, M.H. (2002) Metabolism of quercetin and kaempferol by rat hepatocytes and identification of flavonoid glycosides in plasma. Xenobiotica, 32 (4). pp. 279-287. ISSN 0049-8254

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The metabolism of the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol by rat hepatocytes was investigated using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS). Quercetin and kaempferol were extensively metabolized (98.8 +/- 0.1% and 81.0 +/- 5.1% respectively, n = 4), with four glucuronides of quercetin and two of kaempferol being detected after incubation. 2. The glucuronides of quercetin and kaempferol formed upon incubation with rat hepatocytes were identified as the same ones formed after incubation with the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoform UGT1A9. 3. In addition, plasma samples from human volunteers taken after consumption of capsules of Ginkgo biloba, a plant rich in flavonoid glycosides, were analysed by LC-MS for the presence of flavonoid glucuronides and flavonoid glycosides. Reported is evidence for the presence of flavonoid glycosides in samples of plasma. 4. The results suggest that UGT1A9 is a key UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoform for the metabolism of flavonoids, and that absorption of intact flavonoid glycosides is possible.