Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Electronic diary assessment of traditional and cyber forms of aggression and victimisation

Booth, Josephine N. and Hunter, Simon and Boyle, James and Ortega, R. and Elipe, Paz (2011) Electronic diary assessment of traditional and cyber forms of aggression and victimisation. In: 2011 British Psychological Society Developmental Section Annual Conference, 2011-09-07 - 2011-09-09.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Aggression can be conceptualised according to its function, proactive or reactive, with the former characterised by planning and goal pursuit and the latter by heat-of-the-moment responses to real or perceived threats. However, aggression can also be conceptualised by form, direct or indirect, where the distinction is based upon the degree to which actions take place in direct confrontation or via more clandestine, hidden means. Victimisation too can be characterised as direct or indirect. We argue that understanding how these constructs interact over time can inform theory relating to the relationships between traditional and cyber aggression and victimisation. Here, we outline the development of an electronic daily diary measure of these constructs, and report on early empirical data. Based on Little et al.’s (2003) measure, and following consultations with secondary school pupils, parents, and policy advisory groups, we developed a draft dairy measure. This was piloted with a sample of secondary schools pupils aged 12- to 16-years-old. Psychometric data are reported here, as are preliminary data regarding the relationships between daily activity and assessments of longer-term aggression and victimisation. We conclude by discussing potential future applications of the measure.