Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Learning disability and social inclusion

MacIntyre, Gillian (2008) Learning disability and social inclusion. Policy & Practice in Health and Social Care . Dunedin Academic Press, Edinburgh. ISBN 9781903765838

Full text not available in this repository.

Abstract

People with learning disabilities in Scotland and across the UK as a whole have been the target of considerable legislative and policy change over the last five years. A key theme relates to the inclusion of people with learning disabilities in the community - in education, training and employment and in relation to accessing health, housing and leisure services. As a result of these changes, people with learning disabilities, their families, service providers, policy makers and other professionals working alongside them have to negotiate their way through a complex array of initiatives, regulations and services. This book acknowledges and addresses this complexity by mapping and critically reviewing relevant policy developments, particularly in Scotland and across the UK as a whole. Drawing on the available research evidence, the book adopts a life cycle approach, tracing the journey taken by young adults with learning disabilities from leaving school and making the transition to adulthood and beyond.