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The differing role of success drivers across sequential channels: an application to the motion picture industry

Hennig-Thurau, Thorsten and Houston, Mark B. and Walsh, G. (2006) The differing role of success drivers across sequential channels: an application to the motion picture industry. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 34 (4). pp. 559-575. ISSN 0092-0703

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Abstract

In several product categories, it is typical to release products sequentially to different markets and customer segments. Conventional knowledge holds that the roles of various product success drivers do not differ significantly across these sequential channels of distribution. The authors examine sequential distribution channels within the motion picture industry and develop a model that proposes that such differences exist between a primary (short- and long-term theatrical box office) and a sequential (video rental) channel. The authors test their model with a sample of 331 motion pictures released in theaters and on video during 1999-2001 using partial least squares. Results reveal differences in the impact of success factors across channels. For example, cultural familiarity enhances box office success but relates negatively to video rental success, and distribution intensity and date of release enhance box office outcomes but have no impact on rental revenues.