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Literary linguistics: Open Access research in English language

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by English Studies at Strathclyde. Particular research specialisms include literary linguistics, the study of literary texts using techniques drawn from linguistics and cognitive science.

The team also demonstrates research expertise in Renaissance studies, researching Renaissance literature, the history of ideas and language and cultural history. English hosts the Centre for Literature, Culture & Place which explores literature and its relationships with geography, space, landscape, travel, architecture, and the environment.

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The Essence of Hospitality from the Texts of Classical Antiquity: The development of a hermeneutical helix to identify the origins and philosophy of the phenomenon of hospitality

O'Gorman, Kevin D. (2008) The Essence of Hospitality from the Texts of Classical Antiquity: The development of a hermeneutical helix to identify the origins and philosophy of the phenomenon of hospitality. PhD thesis, University Of Strathclyde.

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Abstract

The research project is an investigation into the origins and philosophy of the phenomenon of hospitality in order to identify the extent to which these are founded in ancient and classical history. The research focuses on Classical Antiquity and specifically investigates the origins of the history and philosophy of the phenomenon of hospitality within Greco-Roman texts and contemporaneous religious writings. In so doing it demonstrates how authoritative and disciplined research can make a significant contribution to the emergent research area of hospitality studies. The resulting thesis details a variety of outcomes and conclusions related to the phenomenon of hospitality, and also provides a basis for further enquiry. The research outcomes support the view that modern hospitality management literature has largely ignored this area of investigation. The principal methodological conclusion is that robust textual analysis can be undertaken within hermeneutical phenomenology and enhanced using a derived hermeneutical helix. The principal investigative outcome is that the hospitality phenomenon in its broadest sense has been recorded since the beginning of human history and it embraces a wide range of activities beyond the commercial provision of food, drink and accommodation. In particular, the essence of the hospitality phenomenon, within Classical Antiquity, is characterised by a reciprocally beneficial two-way process that takes place within three distinct and separate contexts: domestic, civil and commercial, which can also be summarised and represented by dynamic visual models.