Picture child's feet next to pens, pencils and paper

Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

Explore Open Access education research. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Adapting the Toybox obesity prevention intervention for use in Scottish preschools : protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial

Malden, Stephen and Hughes, Adrienne R and Gibson, Ann-Marie and Bardid, Farid and Androutsos, Odysseas and De Craemer, Marieke and Manios, Yannis and Summerbell, Carolyn and Cardon, Greet and Reilly, John J (2018) Adapting the Toybox obesity prevention intervention for use in Scottish preschools : protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 8. ISSN 2044-6055

[img]
Preview
Text (Malden-etal-BMJO-2018-Adapting-the-Toybox-obesity-prevention-intervention-for-use-in-Scottish)
Malden_etal_BMJO_2018_Adapting_the_Toybox_obesity_prevention_intervention_for_use_in_Scottish.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 logo

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Introduction There is an increasing need for the adoption of effective preschool obesity prevention interventions to combat the high levels of early-childhood obesity in the UK. This study will examine the feasibility and acceptability of the adapted version of the ToyBox intervention—a preschool obesity prevention programme—for use in Scotland (ToyBox-Scotland). This will inform the design of a full-scale cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT). Methods and analysis The ToyBox-Scotland intervention will be evaluated using a feasibility cluster RCT, which involves children aged 3–5 years at six preschools in Glasgow, three randomly assigned to the intervention group and three to the usual-care control group. The original ToyBox intervention was adapted for the Scottish context using a coproduction approach. Within the 18-week intervention, physical activity and sedentary behaviour will be targeted in the preschool through environmental changes to the classroom, physical activity sessions and movement breaks. Parents will receive home activity packs every 3 weeks containing sticker incentives and interactive parent–child games that target sedentary behaviour, physical activity, eating/snacking and water consumption. As this is a feasibility study, parameters such as recruitment rates, attrition rates and SDs of outcome measures will be obtained which will inform a power calculation for a future RCT. Additional variables to be assessed include accelerometer-measured physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep, body mass index, home screen time, eating/snacking and water consumption. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline and 14–17 weeks later. Intervention fidelity will be assessed using questionnaires and interviews with parents and practitioners, observation and session delivery records. Ethics and dissemination This study was granted ethical approval by the University of Strathclyde’s School of Psychological Sciences and Health Ethics Committee. Results will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals, presentation at conferences and in lay summaries provided to participants.