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Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

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Being misunderstood in autism : the role of motor disruption in expressive communication, implications for satisfying social relations

Delafield-Butt, Jonathan and Trevarthen, Colwyn and Rowe, Philip and Gillberg, Christopher (2018) Being misunderstood in autism : the role of motor disruption in expressive communication, implications for satisfying social relations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. ISSN 0140-525X (In Press)

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Abstract

Jaswal and Akhtar’s outstanding target article identifies the necessary social nature of the human mind, even in autism. We agree with the authors and present significant contributory origins of this autistic isolation in disruption of purposeful movement made social from infancy. Timing differences in expression can be misunderstood in embodied engagement, and social intention misread. Sensitive relations can repair this.