Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Dynamical simulations of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns

Pascal, Elena and Singh, Saransh and Hourahine, Ben and Trager-Cowan, Carol and De Graef, Marc (2017) Dynamical simulations of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns. Microscopy and Microanalysis, 23 (S1). pp. 540-541. ISSN 1431-9276

[img]
Preview
Text (Pascal-etal-2017-Dynamical-Simulations-of-Transmission-Kikuchi)
Pascal_etal_2017_Dynamical_Simulations_of_Transmission_Kikuchi.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (701kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    Truly nanostructured materials pose a significant spatial resolution challenge to the conventional Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) characterization technique. Nevertheless, the interaction volume can be reduced by the use of electron transparent samples and the acquisition of electron backscatterlike patterns (EBSP) in transmission mode instead. These transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns are typically acquired by mounting a thin foil, similar to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and tilting it at a slight angle (20◦ -30◦ ) from horizontal towards a standard EBSD camera.