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Tracking intracellular uptake and localisation of alkyne tagged fatty acids using Raman spectroscopy

Jamieson, Lauren E. and Greaves, Jennifer and McLellan, Jayde A. and Munro, Kevin R. and Tomkinson, Nicholas C.O. and Chamberlain, Luke H. and Faulds, Karen and Graham, Duncan (2018) Tracking intracellular uptake and localisation of alkyne tagged fatty acids using Raman spectroscopy. Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 197. pp. 30-36. ISSN 1386-1425

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Abstract

Intracellular uptake, distribution and metabolism of lipids is a tightly regulated characteristic in healthy cells. An analytical technique capable of understanding these characteristics with a high level of species specificity in a minimally invasive manner is highly desirable in order to understand better how these become disrupted during disease. In this study, the uptake and distribution of three different alkyne tagged fatty acids in single cells was monitored and compared, highlighting the ability of Raman spectroscopy combined with alkyne tags for better understanding of the fine details with regards to uptake, distribution and metabolism of very chemically specific lipid species. This indicates the promise of using Raman spectroscopy directly with alkyne tagged lipids for cellular studies as opposed to subsequently clicking of a fluorophore onto the alkyne for fluorescence imaging.