Picture of server farm and IT infrastructure

Where technology & law meet: Open Access research on data security & its regulation ...

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs exploring both the technical aspects of computer security, but also the regulation of existing or emerging technologies. A research specialism of the Department of Computer & Information Sciences (CIS) is computer security. Researchers explore issues surrounding web intrusion detection techniques, malware characteristics, textual steganography and trusted systems. Digital forensics and cyber crime are also a focus.

Meanwhile, the School of Law and its Centre for Internet Law & Policy undertake studies on Internet governance. An important component of this work is consideration of privacy and data protection questions and the increasing focus on cybercrime and 'cyberterrorism'.

Explore the Open Access research by CIS on computer security or the School of Law's work on law, technology and regulation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

A multicomponent route to functionalized amides and oxazolidinones

McPherson, Christopher G. and Cooper, Alasdair K. and Bubliauskas, Andrius and Mulrainey, Paul and Jamieson, Craig and Watson, Allan J. B. (2017) A multicomponent route to functionalized amides and oxazolidinones. Organic Letters. ISSN 1523-7060

[img] Text (McPherson-etal-OL2017-A-multicomponent-route-to-functionalized-amides-and-oxazolidinones)
McPherson_etal_OL2017_A_multicomponent_route_to_functionalized_amides_and_oxazolidinones.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 December 2018.

Download (812kB) | Acknowledge terms & request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

An organobase-mediated, multicomponent reaction of unactivated esters, epoxides, and amines is reported, furnishing functionalized amide derivatives. A wide range of substrates are tolerated under the reaction conditions, including chiral epoxides, which react with no erosion of enantiopurity. Facile modification of the method, through replacing the ester derivative with dimethyl carbonate, enables access to the corresponding oxazolidinone derivatives.