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Eu-Mg defects and donor-acceptor pairs in GaN : photodissociation and the excitation transfer problem

Singh, A K and O'Donnell, K P and Edwards, P R and Lorenz, K and Leach, J H and Boćkowski, M (2018) Eu-Mg defects and donor-acceptor pairs in GaN : photodissociation and the excitation transfer problem. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 51 (6). ISSN 0022-3727

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Abstract

We have investigated temperature-dependent photoluminescence (TDPL) profiles of Eu3+ ions implanted in an HVPE-grown bulk GaN sample doped with Mg and of donor-acceptor pairs (DAP) involving the shallow Mg acceptor in GaN(Mg) (unimplanted) and GaN(Mg):Eu samples. Below 125 K, the TDPL of Eu3+ in GaN(Mg):Eu correlates with that of the DAP. Below 75 K, the intensity of Eu3+ emission saturates, indicating a limitation of the numbers of Eu-Mg defects available to receive excitation transferred from the host, while the DAP continues to increase, albeit more slowly in the implanted than the unimplanted sample. Prolonged exposure to UV light at low temperature results in the photodissociation of Eu-Mg defects, in their Eu1(Mg) configuration, with a corresponding increase in shallow DAP emission and the emergence of emission from unassociated EuGa (Eu2) defects.