Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Preliminary phytochemical screening, plant growth inhibition and antimicrobial activity studies of Faidherbia albida legume extracts

Ismail, Abeer M. and Mohamed, Eman A. and Marghany, Marwa R. and Abdel-Motaal, Fatma F. and Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim B. and El-Sayed, Magdi A. (2016) Preliminary phytochemical screening, plant growth inhibition and antimicrobial activity studies of Faidherbia albida legume extracts. Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences, 15 (2). pp. 112-117. ISSN 1658-077X

[img]
Preview
Text (Ismail-etal-SSAS-2016-phytochemical-screening-plant-growth-inhibition-and-antimicrobial-activity-studies-of-Faidherbia-albida-legumes)
Ismail_etal_SSAS_2016_phytochemical_screening_plant_growth_inhibition_and_antimicrobial_activity_studies_of_Faidherbia_albida_legumes.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 logo

Download (578kB) | Preview

Abstract

Phytochemical analysis of the methanolic and aqueous extracts of Faidherbia albida legumes indicated the presence of terpenes, cardiac glycosides, monosaccharides and carbohydrates type of compounds in both extracts. While alkaloids and saponins were found in aqueous extract only, flavonoids were found to be absent in both extracts. The aqueous and methanolic extracts exhibited a potent growth stimulation effect. Inhibition of both the rootlet and shoot showed a dose dependent response. Aqueous extract has a greater inhibitory effect on rootlet growth than shoot growth. The methanolic extract has a greater inhibitory effect than the aqueous extract. Both extracts and some fractions were tested against three pathogenic bacterial species; Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae, also tested against three pathogenic fungal species; Fusarium oxysporum, Alternaria alternate, and Aspergillus niger. Most of the plant extracts stimulate the studied fungal growth specially the aqueous extract. Meanwhile it shows interesting results by inhibiting the growth of the studied pathogenic bacterial species with most extracts and fractions.