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Sensitive SERS nanotags for use with a hand-held 1064 nm Raman spectrometer

Kearns, Hayleigh and Ali, Fatima and Bedics, Matthew A. and Shand, Neil C. and Faulds, Karen and Detty, Michael R. and Graham, Duncan (2017) Sensitive SERS nanotags for use with a hand-held 1064 nm Raman spectrometer. Royal Society Open Science, 4 (7). ISSN 2054-5703

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Abstract

This is the first report of the use of a hand-held 1064 nm Raman spectrometer combined with red shifted surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanotags to provide an unprecedented performance in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region. A library consisting of 17 chalcogenopyrylium nanotags produce extraordinary SERS responses with femtomolar detection limits being obtained using the portable instrument. This is well beyond previous SERS detection limits at this far red shifted wavelength and opens up new options for SERS sensors in the SWIR region of the electromagnetic spectrum (between 950-1700 nm).