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Diffractive triangulation of radiative point sources

Vespucci, S. and Naresh-Kumar, G. and Trager-Cowan, C. and Mingard, K. P. and Maneuski, D. and O'Shea, V. and Winkelmann, A. (2017) Diffractive triangulation of radiative point sources. Applied Physics Letters, 110 (12). ISSN 0003-6951

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Abstract

We describe a general method to determine the location of a point source of waves relative to a two-dimensional single-crystalline active pixel detector. Based on the inherent structural sensitivity of crystalline sensor materials, characteristic detector diffraction patterns can be used to triangulate the location of a wave emitter. The principle described here can be applied to various types of waves provided that the detector elements are suitably structured. As a prototypical practical application of the general detection principle, a digital hybrid pixel detector is used to localize a source of electrons for Kikuchi diffraction pattern measurements in the scanning electron microscope. This approach provides a promising alternative method to calibrate Kikuchi patterns for accurate measurements of microstructural crystal orientations, strains, and phase distributions.