Picture map of Europe with pins indicating European capital cities

Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Intermixing studies in GaN1−xSbx highly mismatched alloys

Sarney, Wendy L. and Svensson, Stefan P. and Ting, Min and Segercrantz, Natalie and Walukiewicz, Wladek and Yu, Kin Man and Martin, Robert W. and Novikov, Sergei V. and Foxon, C.T. Thomas (2016) Intermixing studies in GaN1−xSbx highly mismatched alloys. Applied Optics. ISSN 1559-128X (In Press)

[img] Text (Sarney-etal-AO2016-Intermixing-studies-in-GaN1-xSbx-highly-mismatched-alloys)
Sarney_etal_AO2016_Intermixing_studies_in_GaN1_xSbx_highly_mismatched_alloys.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 September 2017.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

GaN1−xSbx with x~ 5-7% is a highly mismatched alloy predicted to have favorable properties for application as an electrode in a photo-electrochemical cell for solar water splitting. In this study, we grew GaN1−xSbx under conditions intended to induce phase segregation. Prior experiments with the similar alloy GaN1−xAsx, the tendency of Sb to surfact, and the low growth temperatures needed to incorporate Sb, all suggested that GaN1−xSbx alloys would likely exhibit phase segregation. We found that, except for very high Sb compositions, this was not the case, and that instead interdiffusion dominated. Characteristics measured by optical absorption were similar to intentionally grown bulk alloys for the same composition. Furthermore, the alloys produced by this method maintained crystallinity for very high Sb compositions, and allowed higher overall Sb compositions. This method may allow higher temperature growth while still achieving needed Sb compositions for solar water splitting applications.