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Optimising plans using genetic programming

Westerberg, C. Henrik and Levine, John (2014) Optimising plans using genetic programming. In: Proceedings of the Sixth European Conference on Planning. AAAI Press, Palo Alto. ISBN 9781577356295

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Abstract

Finding the shortest plan for a given planning problem is extremely hard. We present a domain independent approach for plan optimisation based on Genetic Programming. The algorithm is seeded with correct plans created by hand-encoded heuristic policy sets. The plans are very unlikely to be optimal but are created quickly. The suboptimal plans are then evolved using a generational algorithm towards the optimal plan. We present initial results from Blocks World and found that GP method almost always improved sub-optimal plans, often drastically.