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Mechanical testing and modelling of the Universal 2 implant

Gislason, M. K. and Foster, E. and Main, D. and Fusiek, G. and Niewczas, P. and Bransby-Zachary, M. and Nash, D. H. (2016) Mechanical testing and modelling of the Universal 2 implant. Medical Engineering and Physics, 38 (6). pp. 511-517. ISSN 1350-4533

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Abstract

Understanding the load mechanics of orthopaedic implants is important to be able to predict their behaviour in-vivo. Much research, both mechanical and clinical, has been carried out on hip and knee implants, but less has been written about the mechanics of wrist implants. In this paper, the load mechanics of the Universal 2 wrist implant have been measured using two types of measuring techniques, strain gauges and Fibre Bragg Grating measurements to measure strains. The results were compared to a finite element model of the implant. The results showed that the computational results were in good agreement with the experimental results. Better understanding of the load mechanics of wrist implants, using models and experimental results can catalyse the development of future generation implants.