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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Control of edge bulge evolution during photoresist reflow and it's application to diamond micro-lens fabrication

Liu, Hangyu and Herrnsdorf, Johannes and Gu, Erdan and Dawson, Martin D. (2016) Control of edge bulge evolution during photoresist reflow and it's application to diamond micro-lens fabrication. Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B, Nanotechnology and Microelectronics: Materials, Processing, Measurement, and Phenomena, 34 (2). ISSN 2166-2754

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Abstract

We present an empirical study of profile evolution of lithographically defined photoresist (PR) patterns during thermal reflow and apply the findings to diamond micro-lens fabrication. During PR reflow, a bulge forms at the edge of the PR pattern and propagates inwards as the temperature and PR thickness are increased. An empirical relationship for this propagation is derived. Furthermore, it was found that at a certain reflow temperature and a limited pattern size, there is a minimum initial thickness of the PR pattern for forming spherical lens profiles. Based on these findings, diamond micro-lenses with a diameter of 400 µm and a previously unachieved radius of curvature of over 13 mm were fabricated. This is underpinned by forming PR micro-lens patterns with a large radius of curvature and transferring the PR patterns through low-selectivity Ar/Cl2 inductively coupled plasma etching.