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Cairo’s plurality of architectural trends and the continuous search for identity

Salama, Ashraf M (2008) Cairo’s plurality of architectural trends and the continuous search for identity. MEI - Viewpoints of the Middle East Institute. pp. 13-15.

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Abstract

Egyptian politics, knowledge, and culture are rooted in the modern physical, sociocultural, and socio-economic realities of Cairo. History — reflecting the intersection of place, society, culture, and technology — adds another dimension to Cairo’s architecture and urbanism. As a result, Cairo today is a complex and diverse city of over 18 million inhabitants with a range of well-established traditions and an array of often competing symbols of religious, political, institutional, and economic powers. Download the full article