Picture of offices in the City of London

Open Access research that is better understanding work in the global economy...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation based within Strathclyde Business School.

Better understanding the nature of work and labour within the globalised political economy is a focus of the 'Work, Labour & Globalisation Research Group'. This involves researching the effects of new forms of labour, its transnational character and the gendered aspects of contemporary migration. A Scottish perspective is provided by the Scottish Centre for Employment Research (SCER). But the research specialisms of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation go beyond this to also include front-line service work, leadership, the implications of new technologies at work, regulation of employment relations and workplace innovation.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Nikos A. Salingaros : a new Vitruvius for 21st-century architecture and urbanism?

Salama, Ashraf M. (2007) Nikos A. Salingaros : a new Vitruvius for 21st-century architecture and urbanism? [Review]

[img]
Preview
PDF (Salama-Archnet-2007-Nikos-A-Salingaros-a-new-vitruvius)
Salama_Archnet_2007_Nikos_A_Salingaros_a_new_vitruvius.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 logo

Download (79kB) | Preview

Abstract

This article adopts the premise that the work of Nikos A. Salingaros marks a true beginning for seriously regaining what cultures and societies have lost throughout the years through the work of many architects, urbanists, and decision makers. It explores the three monographs he has written and views them as a new “De Architectura” for 21st century architecture and urbanism. The article reflects on Vitruvius’s De Architectura and sheds light on selected evolutionary aspects of architecture and the anti-vitruvian practices that continued for hundreds of years, but intensified over the last century. It reviews the attitudes of anti-vitruvian architects that contributed to severe socio-cultural and contextual problematics. The views adopted in this article are based on the conviction that the theories and writings of Salingaros are a reaction and a conscious positive response to these practices, and that these theories will invigorate the creation of humane and livable environments.