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Functionalism and the contemporary architectural discourse : a review of 'Functionalism Revisited' by Jon Lang and Walter Moleski

Salama, Ashraf M (2011) Functionalism and the contemporary architectural discourse : a review of 'Functionalism Revisited' by Jon Lang and Walter Moleski. [Review]

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Abstract

One more important contribution after ‘Creating Architectural Theory’ which represents one of the classical writings on the theories of architecture. In this book, redefining functionalism in architectural theory is the ultimate task of Jon Lang and Walter Moleski. The authors argue, and rightly so, that it is insufficient to define functionalism as merely the utility of buildings and urban spaces. Rather, functionalism is conceived within a broad range of purposes of the built environment, which are important to architects and designers today, and the way in which people experience these intended purposes. People experience buildings either as environments or as objects, both of which are necessary forms of experience. While buildings perceived as objects possess aesthetic value, buildings understood as part of an environment enhance our understanding of that environment, its purposes and meanings.