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Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

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Long-term stability and reliability of scores on the peer-relations subscale of the self-esteem questionnaire

Hunter, S.C. and Boyle, J.M.E. and Warden, D.A. (2006) Long-term stability and reliability of scores on the peer-relations subscale of the self-esteem questionnaire. Educational and Psychology Measurement, 66 (2). pp. 331-341. ISSN 0013-1644

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Abstract

The stability of scores on the Peer-Relations subscale of the Self-Esteem Questionnaire (SEQ) was examined over 11 to 13 months, longer than in previous research. Participants were 839 mainstream Scottish pupils aged 8 to 14 years old (48% male), allowing for the psychometric qualities of the scale to be assessed in a younger sample than previously examined. The subscale scores displayed good internal reliability and moderate testretest stability. Stability did not differ statistically significantly according to gender or school stage, and there were no gender or school-stage effects in relation to actual scores on the subscale. The Peer-Relations subscale of the SEQ appears to yield reliable scores for use with children as young as 8 years old.