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Identifying the dominant failure mode in the hot extrusion tooling used to forge nickel based superalloy

Anderson, Magnus and McGuire, Kenny and Zante, Remi Christophe and Ion, William and Rosochowski, Andrzej and Brooks, Jeffery (2013) Identifying the dominant failure mode in the hot extrusion tooling used to forge nickel based superalloy. Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 213 (1). 111–119. ISSN 0924-0136

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Abstract

The dies used in the extrusion of nickel based super alloys are subject to severe mechanical and thermal stresses, resulting in shortened life and high manufacturing costs. It is necessary to understand the dominant damage mode in order to guide improvements for increased tool life. The operation under examination consists of the hot extrusion of a nickel based superalloy using nitrided hot work tool steel, glassed workpieces and graphite lubrication. The investigation was conducted through a combination of metallurgical analysis, metrology and finite element analysis. Out of the damage modes observed under these conditions, the plastic deformation of the substrate was found to be the cause for tool failure. This paper discusses the relationship between plastic deformation of the substrate and the formation of scoring marks, which fail the die.