Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

BODIPY-based conjugated polymers for broadband light sensing and harvesting applications

Cortizo Lacalle, Diego and Howells, Calvyn T. and Gambino, Salvatore and Vilela, Filipe and Vobecka, Zuzana and Findlay, Neil J. and Inigo, Anto R. and Thomson, Stuart A. J. and Skabara, Peter J. and Samuel, Ifor D. W. and Skabara, Peter (2012) BODIPY-based conjugated polymers for broadband light sensing and harvesting applications. Journal of Materials Chemistry, 22 (28). pp. 14119-14126. ISSN 0959-9428

[img]
Preview
PDF
c2jm32374e.pdf
Final Published Version

Download (647kB) | Preview

Abstract

The synthesis of novel low band-gap polymers has significantly improved light sensing and harvesting in polymer-fullerene devices. Here the synthesis of two low band-gap polymers based on the 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene core (BODIPY), and either bis(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (bis-EDOT) or its all-sulfur analogue bis(3,4-ethylenedithiathiophene) (bis-EDTT) are described. The polymers demonstrate ambipolar charge transport and are shown to be suitable for broadband light sensing and solar energy harvesting in solution-processable polymer-fullerene devices.