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Application of the Transtheoretical model to physical activity in older adults with Type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease

Kirk, Alison and MacMillan, F. and Webster, Nikki (2010) Application of the Transtheoretical model to physical activity in older adults with Type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 11 (4). pp. 320-324. ISSN 1469-0292

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Abstract

Objective: Investigate the relationship between physical activity and components of the Transtheoretical model (TTM), in an older clinical population. Method: 85 people with Type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease (age 64.8 8.2 yrs) completed TTM questionnaires. Physical activity was assessed using the 7-day recall questionnaire. Results: Differences across stage of change were found for physical activity, self-efficacy, the pros of more physical active and 5 processes of change. Physical activity, self-efficacy and the pros of more activity were greater in the maintenance than contemplation stage. Stage differences in processes were: consciousness raising (increased contemplation to action), self-liberation (increased contemplation to maintenance), helping relationships (increased preparation to maintenance), counter conditioning (increased contemplation to preparation, action and maintenance) and reinforcement management (increased contemplation and preparation to maintenance). Experiential processes were used more than behavioural processes in the preparation stage. Conclusions: Findings support the theoretical predictions of the TTM and the use of this model in older clinical populations.