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The effect of anticoagulants on the distribution of chromium VI in blood fractions relevance to patients with metal orthopedic implants

Afolaranmi, G. and Tettey, J.N.A. and Murray, H.M. and Meek, R.M.D. and Grant, M.H. (2010) The effect of anticoagulants on the distribution of chromium VI in blood fractions relevance to patients with metal orthopedic implants. Journal of Arthroplasty, 25 (1). pp. 118-120. ISSN 1532-8406

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Abstract

Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty is associated with elevated circulating levels of cobalt and chromium ions. To establish the long-term safety of metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty, it has been recommended that during clinical follow-up of these patients, the levels of these metal ions in blood be monitored. In this article, we provide information on the distribution of chromium VI ions (the predominant form of chromium released by cobalt-chrome alloys in vivo and in vitro) in blood fractions. Chromium VI is predominantly partitioned into red blood cells compared with plasma (analysis of variance, P < .05). The extent of accumulation in red blood cells is influenced by the anticoagulant used to collect the blood, with EDTA giving a lower partitioning into red cells compared with sodium citrate and sodium heparin.

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  • The effect of anticoagulants on the distribution of chromium VI in blood fractions relevance to patients with metal orthopedic implants. (deposited 26 Mar 2010 15:18) [Currently Displayed]