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Detection of dna and p-450s on silver colloidal nanoparticles by surface-enhanced resonance raman scattering (SERRS)

Smith, W.E. and Polwart, E. and McLaughlin, C. and Mallinder, B.J. and Smith, S.J. and Graham, D. (2001) Detection of dna and p-450s on silver colloidal nanoparticles by surface-enhanced resonance raman scattering (SERRS). In: Proceedings of SPIE: Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Surfaces: Novel Reporters with Biological Applications. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, pp. 73-79.

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Abstract

Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) is a very sensitive and selective detection method that can be used for the analysis of both DNA and P-450s. A number of factors have limited the broader application of the technique. These limitations are described and addressed. An approach to reduce the problems associated with variation of the silver colloids used to provide surface enhancement and chemical methodologies that ensure surface adsorption are presented. A practical approach was used to investigate the nature of the effect. This approach has highlighted the importance of resonance enhancement for ultimate sensitivity. Two approaches to achieve successful detection of DNA using SERRS are described, and, using these two approaches, the possibility of multiplexing is also demonstrated. The analysis of proteins by SERRS is discussed and P-450 is presented as a specific example of the information that may be gained from SERRS of proteins.